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Grazing North Texas: Purpletop Tridens

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By Tony Dean | [email protected]

Purpletop tridens is a native, perennial, warm season bunchgrass that is found across all of Texas except the extreme western areas. It grows in most of the U.S. from the central plains to the East coast. Purple top is easily recognizable once it blooms due to the deep purple color of the seed head. It can grow from three to five feet tall with leaves up to two feet long that are rough to the touch on the leaf margin.

The purple seed head is open, pyramidal shaped, and up to 15 inches long. After maturity, the seed head gives off an oily residue, giving the plant a common name of greasegrass. It is also sometimes called redtop. Purpletop is good grazing for livestock when it first greens up, but becomes less palatable as it matures during summer months. After frost, livestock again prefer to graze Purpletop tridens.

To read more, pick up a copy of the July issue of NTFR Magazine. To subscribe call 940-872-5922.

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Outdoor

Grazing North Texas: Wild Onion

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By Tony Dean, [email protected]

There are 14 species and several varieties of wild onion in Texas. These herbs are biennial or perennial and all are strongly scented with an onion or garlic/onion scent. During early spring in Texas, underground bulbs (small onions) give rise to two long narrow leaves and a stalk that grows between the leaves which supports a cluster of small flowers. These flowers can be white, yellow, pink, red, or purple.

Wild onions belong to the genus Allium which includes not only onions, but also shallots, scallions, leeks, chives, and garlic, all of which are edible. Wild onions are common over much of the United States and grow in every region of Texas. They are adapted to almost every soil type.

Both wild onions and cultivated onions contain trace amounts of a toxic agent called N-propyl disulfide, which destroys red blood cells. The amount of toxins varies widely in plants, varieties and species, and a large amount would need to be consumed for poisoning to occur, so poisoning issues in people or livestock are very rare.

To read more, pick up a copy of the June issue of NTFR magazine. To subscribe by mail, call 940-872-5922.

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Outdoor

Parting Shot: Dancing with Rain…

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By Jelly Cocanougher

With rainfall expressing all over the region, it looks in resemblance to landscapes that drape over the English countryside when viewed with a squint. There are lush and greened up landscapes with newly adorned blossoms peacocking themselves. Meanwhile, cowboys chase the horizon, in pursuit of cattle they seek to gather. A poetic infrastructure claims the enriched land, solace between nature, and the symbiotic relationship of horse and man.

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Grazing North Texas: Bud Break

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By Tony Dean, [email protected]

Many of us who live and work in the country take note of when mesquites leaf out in the spring. For most people, this is just a casual observation of life around us and a promise that warm weather is around the corner.

If you are interested in killing mesquite with an herbicide, “bud break” on mesquites is a significant event and signals the beginning of your planning for a successful control.
Mesquites go through a fairly predictable life cycle every year. This, of course, changes somewhat with location, weather patterns, soils, and other factors, but the overall process is very similar wherever you find mesquite.

To read more, pick up a copy of the May issue of NTFR magazine. To subscribe by mail, call 940-872-5922.

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