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June 2016 Profile – The man behind the mic: Bob Tallman

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By Jessica Crabtree 

You know his voice almost immediately after he utters one word. It’s filled with his grizzly drawl and diction. You recognize it whether it’s at the Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo, Houston, Reno, Calgary or even the National Finals in Las Vegas. With a voice known as “The Voice of Professional Rodeo,” handle-bar mustache and cowboy hat, who is Bob Tallman?

Tallman wasn’t born in Texas, but after spending more than 40 years here, who would know? Born October 25, 1947, in Winnemucca, Nev., his raising was in northern Nevada on a cow/calf operation. Tallman is a fifth generation cattleman. With a younger sister, the family lived in a home with no electricity or running water. He attended a one-room school until the fifth grade that started in April and let out in September, in correlation to ranch gatherings and cattle works. The teacher, a lady, was also a buckaroo, though all were. That was their lifestyle.

“It was a buckaroo outfit, a rodeo every morning! I didn’t know a Shetland pony existed until college. My dad didn’t start a colt before the age of five,” Tallman laughed. Moving in the sixth grade, Tallman recalls several humorous memories from his childhood. “I played football three days; my friends beat the fire out of me. I thought, ‘I can rope and ride and enjoy it,”” That was all the football Tallman could stand. Roping and riding was more his style.

In ’66, Tallman attended college at Cal Poly. Leasing a ranch and working the sale barn, he added trading cattle and horses, Tallman admitted he soon forgot why he was there. He later transferred to the University of Nevada. To read more pick up a copy of the June 2016 issue.

best headshot bob and father as a young boy Bob and Kristen Tallman Tallman family high res

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Country Lifestyles

On the Road with Dave Alexander

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As 2024 begins to unfold and you find yourself looking for something fun to do, why not turn to one of the finest entertainment venues in Cooke County? That would be Butterfield Stage. That’s right, audiences have been entertained by the Butterfield Stage Players for more than 40 years. This wonderful community theater was formed back in 1979 when a few local residents decided to embark on creating a community theater. I believe the best entertainment is live entertainment. So don’t find yourself shut in with an old Hallmark movie or old reruns this year.

To read more, pick up a copy of the February 2024 issue of NTFR magazine.

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Country Lifestyles

Lacey’s Pantry: Grilled Cheese & Tomato Soup Bake

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By Lacey Vilhauer

Ingredients:
3 ounces reduced-fat cream cheese
1 ½ tsp dried basil, divided
12 slices Italian, sourdough or rye bread
6 slices mozzarella cheese
6 Tbsp butter, softened
½ cup tomato paste
1 garlic clove, minced
¼ tsp salt
¼ tsp pepper
1 ¾ cup 2% milk
2 large eggs
1 cup shredded Italian cheese

Directions:
Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. In a small bowl, mix cream cheese and 1 tsp basil until blended and spread onto 6 bread slices. Top with slices of mozzarella cheese and remaining bread slices. Butter exterior of all 12 bread slices. Arrange sandwiches in a greased 9×13 baking dish with at least 2-inch sides. Set aside.

To read more, pick up a copy of the February 2024 issue of NTFR magazine. To subscribe by mail, call 940-872-5922.

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Country Lifestyles

Agriculture’s Ties to Valentine’s Days

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By Dani Blackburn

February 14 has become known as the day of love, celebrated each year with loved ones exchanging roses, chocolate and gifts over candlelight dinners all in the name of St. Valentine. The true origin of the holiday remains a mystery but stems from both Christian and Roman backgrounds.

Today, the holiday pours millions of dollars into the country’s economy. While some tout it as nothing but a commercialized holiday for big business, the numbers prove it provides an economic boost. According to the National Retail Federation, consumers in the United States spent a whopping $25.9 billion on Valentine’s Day in 2023, the highest number reported since 2004.

Consumers were expected to spend an average of $192.80, but they were not only buying for significant others. They also shopped for friends, children’s classmates, teachers, coworkers, and more to make the day special for those they cared about, and none of it would be possible without agriculture.

To read more, pick up a copy of the February 2024 issue of NTFR magazine. To subscribe by mail, call 940-872-5922.

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