Connect with us

HOME

The Natural Horseman – Christmas 2016

Published

on

By Steve Stevens

What a wild ride this year has been, like riding Frontier Rodeo Company’s bronc, “Medicine Woman,” with one pedal. We have worked with a lot of different horses and people this year. Amanda has had multiple surgeries reclaiming her body after defeating breast cancer. I became the coach of the Weatherford Youth Wrestling team, learning more from those tough kids than I could ever teach them in a lifetime.

Amanda’s Grandfather passed and she lost a dear friend who inspired her to live every moment.

We have seen the kindness of new and old friends. Watched our children continue to grow into little buckaroos, ride their first roller coaster. My five-year-old son asked me today if we could bring food to the homeless for Christmas this morning,proud father.
We have had elections, Olympics and the Cowboys are a Super Bowl quality team, wow it’s about time.

I think through the year of all of the different horse personalities we have met. Like the paint horse, “Buckshot” that was saved from the killers, how he has touched our hearts. He came as a horse that wanted to buck and not move forward, now he is so fun to ride and shows his unique personality every day.

I think of Amanda’s dear friend Trina, a recent ovarian cancer survivor who lights up the room with her smile.

I know we do a lot of preaching here at Stevens Natural Horsemanship about horses and how they help the human. I know we are not perfect and that doing the right thing every moment of every day is the challenge of all challenges.

But in the state of this beautiful country and world these holidays, I ask all of you to show love and kindness to all.

Try to remember that just like the horses, if we didn’t raise them, we don’t know their lifetime experiences. We are all just trying to get through this life one step at a time and I know in my heart that love and understanding can heal the most damaged of souls.

Make sure to give your horse a hug and kiss. If you haven’t handled them in a while, just find some quiet time to soak in their beauty.
In this new year- keep riding your dream, never give up, let your horse take you on the journey of a lifetime.

God Bless and Merry Christmas!

Love,
The Stevens Family
Steve, Amanda, Ryder and Violet

Amanda and Snowflake.

 

A crisp day with the horses overlooking a pond.

The Stevens Family, Amanda, Steve, Ryder and Violet. (Photos courtesy of Steve Stevens)

Continue Reading

HOME

Joe N. “Buzz” Thorp to Receive Ranching Heritage Association Working Cowboy Award

Published

on

By

Joe N. “Buzz” Thorp, a cowboy who has worked on ranches from Tennessee to Montana and New Mexico to Texas, will be the sixth recipient of the Ranching Heritage Association (RHA) Working Cowboy Award presented during the annual National Golden Spur Award Honors on Saturday, October 5, at the Lubbock Memorial Civic Center in Lubbock, Texas. 

“The RHA Working Cowboy Award is designed to recognize an outstanding individual who makes his living primarily horseback, caring for livestock on a daily basis,” said Jim Bret Campbell, executive director of the Ranching Heritage Association and the National Ranching Heritage Center. “Buzz Thorp represents all of the facets of the working cowboy award. He is a cowboy’s cowboy, a teacher and a true representative of our cow-country values.” 

The Ranching Heritage Association, a nationwide non-profit membership organization supporting historical preservation and educational efforts through the National Ranching Heritage Center, presents the prestigious recognition on an annual basis. The award honors a working cowboy skilled in all aspects of ranch work and respected by the ranch crew and ranching community. 

“Our Board of Directors believes it’s important to recognize those folks who brave all kinds of weather and conditions to ensure that work on a ranch gets done,” Campbell said, noting that award nominations for Thorp described him as a multi-talented working cowboy who has served for decades as a role model for younger cowboys in trade and character. 

“More than a cowboy, Buzz is a cowman and a steward,” stated Rob A. Brown, who grew up working with Buzz on the R.A. Brown Ranch. “He is a horseman and a conservationist with expertise in so many areas that this letter could be filled merely listing them out. In my view, at the most fundamental sense, Buzz is a teacher.” 

Thorp worked for his father, B.F. Thorp, in Throckmorton County in Texas while growing up. He also cowboyed for his uncles and cousins during that time. He worked for the Muleshoe Cattle Company while attending Texas Tech University, where he graduated with a degree in animal husbandry in 1954.  

At age 21, Thorp managed Ridglea Angus Farms in Dickson, Tennessee, before returning to Throckmorton where he worked for the R.A. Brown, McClusky and Birdwell ranches. He also ran his own cows and trained horses. In 1974, Thorp became the cow boss at Spanish Creek Ranch in Gallatin Gateway, Montana. From there, he moved to manage yearlings on Jones Ranch at Wagon Mound, New Mexico. Thorp managed the McKee Ranch in Galisteo, New Mexico, before returning to Texas to manage ranches in Palo Pinto, Throckmorton and Baylor counties, including the Wagon Creek Spade Ranch outfit. Thorp managed that division of the Spade Ranches for 10 out of the 12 years he worked there.

Recognized as an outstanding stockman, horseman and teacher, at age 91, Thorp continues to be in demand to day-work on neighboring ranches, including the R.A. Brown Ranch. A notable horse trainer, Thorp has trained horses that have gone on to successful careers on ranches and in the arena, including for his grandson, Wesley Thorp, who is a two-time Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association heeling world champion. 

“As his grandson, childhood stories were often told about his days working cattle and training horses,” Wesley said. “He’s [had an influence] on many great ranches such as Haythorn, Swenson and Browns. He is an all-around hand and one great cowboy. The impact he has had on my team roping career is one that will last forever.” 

“In addition to his technical skills, Buzz is also an outstanding leader and mentor,” said Kelli Brown of the R.A. Brown Ranch. “He is always willing to share his knowledge and expertise with others, whether they are seasoned ranch hands or newcomers to the industry. His patience and dedication make him an asset to any neighbors and friends. I am thankful that he has mentored numerous generations of our Brown family, including my husband and sons.” 

Thorp’s lifetime of cowboying accomplishments will be honored at the National Golden Spur Award Honors on October 5. Sponsorship packages for the National Golden Spur Award Honors, including table sponsorships, are currently available. Individual tickets for the National Golden Spur Award Honors will go on sale to the public August 8. For event details visit goldenspurhonors.com.  

  

Continue Reading

HOME

Farm and Ranch Injuries

Published

on

By

By Barry Whitworth, DVM

In January, I attended the Oklahoma Veterinary Conference. While waiting for one of the sessions to start, a classmate of mine commented how many of the attendees walk with a limp, used a cane, and/or have damaged hands. We all agreed that working with animals is hard on the body. In general, anything associated with farming and ranching is dangerous.

Most farmers and ranchers know that agriculture is a dangerous occupation. According to United States Bureau of Statistics, workers involved in agriculture, forestry, and fishing had the highest occupational fatality rate in 2022. The fatality rate of 23.5 per 100,000 full-time equivalent (FTE) workers for this group is much higher when compared to the overall occupation fatality rate of 3.7 per 100,000 FTE. Most of the agriculture-related fatalities are associated with transportation, such as tractor overturns, and vehicle crashes, but a fair number involve livestock.

To read more, pick up a copy of the March issue of NTFR magazine. To subscribe by mail, call 940-872-5922.

Continue Reading

HOME

Jesses Jewelz

Published

on

By

By Jesse Kader

Comfy and keep it western. That’s the name of the game this month. It’s hot and who wants clingy clothing? This jumpsuit is perfectly comfortable and relaxed without forfeiting the fashion. Dress it up or keep it casual. See this and more at www.jessesjewelz.com.

Continue Reading
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad

Trending