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Equine

Winter Hoof Care:Keep Your Horse’s FeetHealthy in the Cold

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By Savannah Magoteaux

As winter sets in, horse owners must pay extra attention to their equine companions’ hoof health. Colder weather poses unique challenges that can lead to common hoof issues if not addressed proactively. This article aims to provide insights into combatting prevalent hoof problems during winter, choosing appropriate hoof protection, and offering tips to prevent conditions such as thrush and other infections.

Combatting Common Hoof Issues in Colder Weather:
Cracked Hooves

Cold temperatures and dry air can contribute to hoof cracking. To combat this issue, it is crucial to maintain proper moisture levels. Regularly applying a hoof conditioner or moisturizer can help prevent excessive drying and cracking.

Snow and Ice Accumulation

Snow and ice buildup can lead to discomfort and increased risk of injury.
Keeping the hooves properly trimmed is essential to prevent the accumulation of snowballs.
Additionally, consider using traction devices such as snow pads or special shoes for added grip in icy conditions.

To read more, pick up a copy of the February 2024 issue of NTFR magazine. To subscribe by mail, call 940-872-5922.

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Equine

Rodeo: A Year of Hard Work

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By Phillip Kitts

Rodeo is much more than a weeklong event for the average rodeo committee.
As rodeo fans, it is always an exciting time of year when the local rodeo rolls into town. The energy and excitement of livestock, contract acts, and big-name cowboys is a highlight for many small towns around the nation.

What often goes very unnoticed is the tenacious process that goes into putting on a rodeo of any level for a community. As a rodeo enthusiast, has it ever crossed your mind all the steps it can take to connect with the right contractor and make sure they have the livestock needed, along with a place to house these animals? Add to this all the accommodation to host several hundred rodeo athletes over a weekend. From food all the way to porta potties this is a monumental task. This month, let’s take some time to start with the end of the rodeo and proceed through the final stages of hosting next year’s events.

Most rodeos take no more than a week or two after they complete their event to start the process of preparing for the next year. Something that is not common knowledge is that very rarely are rodeo committees paid individuals, in almost all cases, the folks that put on a local rodeo are a volunteer force.

To read more, pick up a copy of the February 2024 issue of NTFR magazine. To subscribe by mail, call 940-872-5922.

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Equine

Consistent McCartney

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By Krista Lucas Wynn

Breakaway is known to be the fastest event in rodeo. At the 2023 National Finals Breakaway Roping, conducted Dec. 5-6 at the South Point Arena & Equestrian Center in Las Vegas, Nev., no one was faster on 10 calves than Cheyanne McCartney.

The Kingston, Okla., cowgirl competed in a grueling match between the top 15 breakaway ropers in the world, and when it was all said and done had roped nine head in 32.2 seconds.
She split the win in round two with Hali Williams and continued her consistency throughout the two days of competition. She placed in four more rounds to help her win the coveted average title.

McCartney’s story did not start at the 2023 NFBR. This was her third qualification to the NFBR, and a lot of hard work went into getting where she is today. McCartney grew up in Louisiana, where her first rodeo memory began with entering the breakaway roping at a Little Britches rodeo in Deridder, La.

“My family was in the Quarter Horse racing industry, growing up. My father, Carl Guillory, was a trainer and calf roper,” McCartney said.

To read more, pick up a copy of the February 2024 issue of NTFR magazine. To subscribe by mail, call 940-872-5922.

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Equine

Equine Dental Disease & Complications

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By Dr. Garrett Metcalf

It is no secret that horses are very reliant on their teeth for survival. The horse has to be able to apprehend and grind feed to get adequate nutrition to meet their daily caloric needs.
Horses have teeth that constantly need to erupt to keep up with the physical demanding work of grinding food, but their teeth have a finite life span, and once they are used up there is nothing to replace them.

Good dentition is also important for the overall health, performance and well-being of a horse. Horses with inadequate or lack of dental care can have performance issues, weight loss, colic, dental pain and secondary sinus infections due to poor dentition. The goal of this article is to address more complicated dental issues and to inform the readers of how to avoid and detect dental issues as well as discuss treatment options if these problems arise.

Many owners are aware of common dental issues that horses face and the importance to get them addressed with routine dental care, but not all owners are aware of secondary complications that occur from dental problems. One of the most common complications that occurs from a bad tooth is tooth root abscesses that drain into the sinuses or from a tract out the bottom of the mandible or jaw.

To read more, pick up a copy of the January 2024 issue of NTFR magazine. To subscribe by mail, call 940-872-5922.

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