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Farm & Ranch

Land Market Report: January Land Sales

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By Jared Groce

January land sales remained very low as a by-product of Q4 of 2022. It takes an average of 30 to 45 days from contract to close for a parcel of land, so we are seeing the leftovers of a very slow December. In fact, these are the lowest numbers I can remember in my 15 years in the land brokerage business.

But, call volume, along with the numbers of showings and contracts written, have increased drastically over the month of January, which should mean a lot more closings in the months of February and March. I expect this trend to continue to increase during the next several months as well as buyers once again get the itch to own their own little piece of dirt in North Texas. I expect that the serious investors who have been sitting on the sideline for the past five to seven months will also come to the realization that the sky is not falling after all, and once again start buying up tracts of land for investment growth as well as a hedge against inflation.

To read more, pick up a copy of the March issue of NTFR Magazine. To subscribe call 940-872-5922.

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Farm & Ranch

Grass Tetany (Hypomagnesemia)

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By Barry Whitworth, DVM

With spring approaching, producers should be aware of a disease associated with rapidly growing forages. Hypomagnesemia is commonly referred to as grass tetany. The disease is a serious and often fatal metabolic disease that occurs in cattle and less commonly in sheep and goats. The disease is characterized by low blood and cerebral spinal fluid levels of magnesium.
Low level of magnesium in animals is associated with tetanic convulsions. The disease is often associated with grazing lush green pastures during cold rainy weather in early spring. Other names for hypomagnesemia are grass staggers, hypomagnesmic tetany, lactation tetany, or wheat pasture poisoning.

Magnesium is an important mineral because it activates many enzymes in chemical reactions in the body. Without this mineral, cells are unable to produce energy, transport genetic information, transport materials across cell membranes, and nerves cease to respond in a normal manner. Magnesium also plays a role in electrolyte balances in the body.

Maintaining magnesium levels requires adequate daily intake to meet the needs of the animal. Factors that increase magnesium requirements are fetal growth during pregnancy, milk production, soft tissue growth, and bone growth. Failure to absorb magnesium may lower blood levels as well.

To read more, pick up a copy of the February 2024 issue of NTFR magazine. To subscribe by mail, call 940-872-5922.

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Farm & Ranch

Ag Elsewhere: Montana

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By Lindsey Monk

Hope someone is whispering sweet nothings in your ear this Valentine’s Day!

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Farm & Ranch

Ag Elsewhere: Wyoming

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By Tressa Lawrence

May you find yourselves bedded down and cozy this February!

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