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2023 Run for a Million Will Include a Cutting Competition

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FORT WORTH – The National Cutting Horse Association is thrilled to announce that the groundbreaking
Run For A Million has established a cutting competition to debut with the 2023 event.


Designed by the visionary producer Taylor Sheridan, the inaugural Run For A Million was established in
2019 as a reining competition and has continued to grow over the last several years, expanding across
the Western performance horse industry. The cutting component of The Run For A Million will be a one
of a kind competition where riders can qualify to enter.


“The Run For A Million is the premiere event in Western equine sports,” said Sheridan. “It is only fitting
that the great sport of cutting is represented there, exposing this exciting discipline to a new audience
with the goal of expanding the sport of cutting and extending the show career of these phenomenal
equine athletes.”


An opportunity to qualify for this event will be held at the 2022 Brazos Bash scheduled for October 4
through 17, 2022, at Sheridan’s Bosque Ranch in Weatherford, Texas. Any horse is eligible to compete,
and the top 10 placing riders from the Brazos Bash qualifying event will advance to the Run For A Million
cutting competition held in August 2023 in Las Vegas, Nevada.


“The sport of cutting has been experiencing tremendous growth over the past few years, and the
popularity Sheridan’s Yellowstone is a big driver of this,” said Jay Winborn, NCHA executive director.
“Cutting is the most thrilling sport, and we are looking forward to bringing our sport to a new stage
through this one of a kind competition next August.”


More exciting information on the Run For A Million cutting competition will be forthcoming. Stay tuned!
For the Brazos Bash schedule, entry information and more, contact Kim Cox, Brazos Bash show secretary,
at [email protected].

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Equine

Rodeo: A Year of Hard Work

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By Phillip Kitts

Rodeo is much more than a weeklong event for the average rodeo committee.
As rodeo fans, it is always an exciting time of year when the local rodeo rolls into town. The energy and excitement of livestock, contract acts, and big-name cowboys is a highlight for many small towns around the nation.

What often goes very unnoticed is the tenacious process that goes into putting on a rodeo of any level for a community. As a rodeo enthusiast, has it ever crossed your mind all the steps it can take to connect with the right contractor and make sure they have the livestock needed, along with a place to house these animals? Add to this all the accommodation to host several hundred rodeo athletes over a weekend. From food all the way to porta potties this is a monumental task. This month, let’s take some time to start with the end of the rodeo and proceed through the final stages of hosting next year’s events.

Most rodeos take no more than a week or two after they complete their event to start the process of preparing for the next year. Something that is not common knowledge is that very rarely are rodeo committees paid individuals, in almost all cases, the folks that put on a local rodeo are a volunteer force.

To read more, pick up a copy of the February 2024 issue of NTFR magazine. To subscribe by mail, call 940-872-5922.

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Equine

Winter Hoof Care:Keep Your Horse’s FeetHealthy in the Cold

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By Savannah Magoteaux

As winter sets in, horse owners must pay extra attention to their equine companions’ hoof health. Colder weather poses unique challenges that can lead to common hoof issues if not addressed proactively. This article aims to provide insights into combatting prevalent hoof problems during winter, choosing appropriate hoof protection, and offering tips to prevent conditions such as thrush and other infections.

Combatting Common Hoof Issues in Colder Weather:
Cracked Hooves

Cold temperatures and dry air can contribute to hoof cracking. To combat this issue, it is crucial to maintain proper moisture levels. Regularly applying a hoof conditioner or moisturizer can help prevent excessive drying and cracking.

Snow and Ice Accumulation

Snow and ice buildup can lead to discomfort and increased risk of injury.
Keeping the hooves properly trimmed is essential to prevent the accumulation of snowballs.
Additionally, consider using traction devices such as snow pads or special shoes for added grip in icy conditions.

To read more, pick up a copy of the February 2024 issue of NTFR magazine. To subscribe by mail, call 940-872-5922.

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Equine

Consistent McCartney

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By Krista Lucas Wynn

Breakaway is known to be the fastest event in rodeo. At the 2023 National Finals Breakaway Roping, conducted Dec. 5-6 at the South Point Arena & Equestrian Center in Las Vegas, Nev., no one was faster on 10 calves than Cheyanne McCartney.

The Kingston, Okla., cowgirl competed in a grueling match between the top 15 breakaway ropers in the world, and when it was all said and done had roped nine head in 32.2 seconds.
She split the win in round two with Hali Williams and continued her consistency throughout the two days of competition. She placed in four more rounds to help her win the coveted average title.

McCartney’s story did not start at the 2023 NFBR. This was her third qualification to the NFBR, and a lot of hard work went into getting where she is today. McCartney grew up in Louisiana, where her first rodeo memory began with entering the breakaway roping at a Little Britches rodeo in Deridder, La.

“My family was in the Quarter Horse racing industry, growing up. My father, Carl Guillory, was a trainer and calf roper,” McCartney said.

To read more, pick up a copy of the February 2024 issue of NTFR magazine. To subscribe by mail, call 940-872-5922.

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