Connect with us

Farm & Ranch

The Italian Breed – Chianina Cattle

Published

on

By Jessica Crabtree

The breed Chianina isn’t a modern breed, but in fact has been around centuries as one of the oldest cattle breeds. Chianina cattle have very distinct characteristics that make them stand out from others. What gives these creatures away? Maybe it is their unusually long legs, white color and muscular body.

To understand the breed, one must understand where and how they originated. The Chianina received its name from the Chiana Valley in the province of Tuscany in Central Italy. That is where the breed primarily originated; however, according to an article titled, “Chianina” from the Cattle

Exchange website, the largest representatives of the breed originated from the plains of Arezzo and Siena, Italy.

In ancient times the breed was known as a draft breed used to assist in farming practices, even being the object of Roman sculptures. Today, through modernization in agriculture, the breed is better utilized for beef. According to the Cattle Exchange website, Chianina were first discovered by U.S. servicemen while stationed in Italy during World War II. It wasn’t until ’71 that the first Chianina semen was imported to the U.S., introducing the genetics.

To read more pick up a copy of the February 2017 NTFR issue. To subscribe call 940-872-5922.

 

Keith and Dana Schrick receiving an award for their 40 years of membership to the American Chianina Association during the national show in Louisville, Ky. (Photo courtesy of the Schrick family)

Continue Reading

Farm & Ranch

Ranch Biosecurity

Published

on

By

By Barry Whitworth, DVM

With beef, pork, and poultry exports playing a vital role in the economic health of livestock operations, producers need to understand the dangers that foreign animal diseases and other diseases may have on the viability of their operations.

The recent discovery of Influenza A H5N1 virus in dairy cattle demonstrates the vulnerability of livestock operations to disease events. Sick animals are not the only consequence of a disease outbreak. The economic cost associated with disease can be high. Also, in foreign animal disease outbreaks, export markets can be temporarily lost. Currently, Columbia has restricted fresh/frozen beef and beef products from states with dairy herds testing positive for Avian Influenza. The best defense against these threats is a good biosecurity plan.

To read more, pick up a copy of the June issue of NTFR magazine. To subscribe by mail, call 940-872-5922.

Continue Reading

Farm & Ranch

Ag Elsewhere: Montana

Published

on

By

In Montana, June brings irrigating, brandings, and some wondrous sights from Mother Nature.

Continue Reading

Farm & Ranch

Ag Elsewhere: Wyoming

Published

on

By

By Tressa Lawrence

Happy June from the lands of Wyoming!

Continue Reading
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad

Trending