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Meanwhile, back at the ranch…

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By Rayford Pullen 

First, this is the time of year we truly need to remember why we do what we do and be grateful that we can pursue our dream. Our families and our friends are the most wonderful assets we have in our lives and just like the land and the livestock we care for, we must also do the same with those who make our lives complete. Enjoy the holiday season; it’s that time of the year to give thanks for all we have and all that we are about. From the Pullen Angus crew, Carla Sue, Brad Liggett, Cliff and Jo Norman, James Lawrence and me, enjoy the season and keep our Lord and Savior in all that you do.

Stress can come quickly when dealing with cattle especially when it comes to calving heifers. The friends and family I mentioned above will get to see a side of you like what I imagine happens during a three-alarm fire. Case in point happened the day before this article was written but may provide good information as we close in on spring calving season although it is in the dead of winter.
We saw the feet appear at 4:50 p.m. and this first-calf heifer has absolutely no experience in delivering a calf. It is now 5:50 and there she is, up and down, walking around, and we are trying to decide what to do next. Our rule of thumb at Pullen Angus is to allow two hours for the heifer to have a calf before we intervene.

To read more pick up a copy of the December 2016 NTFR issue. Call 940-872-5922 to subscribe!

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Farm & Ranch

Grass Tetany (Hypomagnesemia)

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By Barry Whitworth, DVM

With spring approaching, producers should be aware of a disease associated with rapidly growing forages. Hypomagnesemia is commonly referred to as grass tetany. The disease is a serious and often fatal metabolic disease that occurs in cattle and less commonly in sheep and goats. The disease is characterized by low blood and cerebral spinal fluid levels of magnesium.
Low level of magnesium in animals is associated with tetanic convulsions. The disease is often associated with grazing lush green pastures during cold rainy weather in early spring. Other names for hypomagnesemia are grass staggers, hypomagnesmic tetany, lactation tetany, or wheat pasture poisoning.

Magnesium is an important mineral because it activates many enzymes in chemical reactions in the body. Without this mineral, cells are unable to produce energy, transport genetic information, transport materials across cell membranes, and nerves cease to respond in a normal manner. Magnesium also plays a role in electrolyte balances in the body.

Maintaining magnesium levels requires adequate daily intake to meet the needs of the animal. Factors that increase magnesium requirements are fetal growth during pregnancy, milk production, soft tissue growth, and bone growth. Failure to absorb magnesium may lower blood levels as well.

To read more, pick up a copy of the February 2024 issue of NTFR magazine. To subscribe by mail, call 940-872-5922.

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Farm & Ranch

Ag Elsewhere: Montana

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By Lindsey Monk

Hope someone is whispering sweet nothings in your ear this Valentine’s Day!

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Farm & Ranch

Ag Elsewhere: Wyoming

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By Tressa Lawrence

May you find yourselves bedded down and cozy this February!

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