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Photographing the Cowboys of the Waggoner Ranch

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By Jessica Crabtree

What is a photo worth? Can a price be placed on an image, or does it remain priceless? What if a photo captures a piece of living history and preserves it for years so that multiple generations will know it existed? That is the sentiment behind the book, Cowboys of the Waggoner Ranch. The glossy, bound book is comprised of 180 images displaying true Texas history and documenting a way of life.

Photographer, Jeremy Enlow, of Weatherford, is the master-mind behind the outstanding book. Page by page the photos are made up of magnificent colors created by Mother Nature and the individuals who inhabit the Waggoner Ranch, the cowboys. Each presents his own story and ties to the colossal ranch. Some are third and fourth generation; some have been there since graduating high school, while others came home after a stint in the army. Whatever their reason, their living places them as part of the Waggoner Ranch tradition handed down from founder Daniel “Dan” Dale Waggoner to his son W.T. “Tom” Waggoner and every generation of cowboy after. It categorizes them as part of the largest ranch within one fence—at 510,572 acres. It also attaches them to the Waggoner name as Tom became known as the greatest cattleman in Texas and wealthiest man this side of the Mississippi.

Enlow first visited the ranch in April of 2015, expanding his equestrian photos. A photographer by trade, Enlow grew up a newspaper editor’s son and was always around cameras. To read more pick up the April 2016 issue of NTFR.

Jimbo Glover (left), coffee cup in hand, watches to see that everyone is loaded and then leads the long line of vehicles out to the pasture on the Waggoner Ranch.  George Calvin Self rests on the toolbox of the truck. The Waggoner Ranch, located in North Texas, is the largest ranch under one fence in the United States spreading 510,00 acres into six counties. Photographer Jeremy Enlow documented the 26 cowboys who work on the ranch and published a 140 page coffee table hardcover book, Cowboys of the Waggoner Ranch, which was released Nov. 1, 2015. The book is available to purchase at waggonercowboys.com

Jimbo Glover (left), coffee cup in hand, watches to see that everyone is loaded and then leads the long line of vehicles out to the pasture on the Waggoner Ranch. George Calvin Self rests on the toolbox of the truck.
The Waggoner Ranch, located in North Texas, is the largest ranch under one fence in the United States spreading 510,00 acres into six counties.
Photographer Jeremy Enlow documented the 26 cowboys who work on the ranch and published a 140 page coffee table hardcover book, Cowboys of the Waggoner Ranch, which was released Nov. 1, 2015.
The book is available to purchase at waggonercowboys.com

The calvesÕ right ears are marked with a nine underbit with a crop, a mark that is registered along with the Waggoner brand. A nine underbit means the crop is on the bottom, or underside, of the ear, and is curved similar to the back of the number nine. The end of the ear is lopped off straight. The ear crop began to be used in the late 1800s to thwart cattle rustlers who attempted to alter ownersÕ brands and claim the cattle as their own. The crop also helps cowboys identify a cowÕs ownership when they are riding on the wrong side and canÕt see a cowÕs brand. Calves also are given an ear tag they will wear all their lives. The Waggoner Ranch, located in North Texas, is the largest ranch under one fence in the United States spreading 510,00 acres into six counties. Photographer Jeremy Enlow documented the 26 cowboys who work on the ranch and published a 140 page coffee table hardcover book, Cowboys of the Waggoner Ranch, which was released Nov. 1, 2015. The book is available to purchase at waggonercowboys.com

The calvesÕ right ears are marked with a nine underbit with a crop, a mark that is registered along with the Waggoner brand. A nine underbit means the crop is on the bottom, or underside, of the ear, and is curved similar to the back of the number nine. The end of the ear is lopped off straight. The ear crop began to be used in the late 1800s to thwart cattle rustlers who attempted to alter ownersÕ brands and claim the cattle as their own. The crop also helps cowboys identify a cowÕs ownership when they are riding on the wrong side and canÕt see a cowÕs brand. Calves also are given an ear tag they will wear all their lives.
The Waggoner Ranch, located in North Texas, is the largest ranch under one fence in the United States spreading 510,00 acres into six counties.
Photographer Jeremy Enlow documented the 26 cowboys who work on the ranch and published a 140 page coffee table hardcover book, Cowboys of the Waggoner Ranch, which was released Nov. 1, 2015.
The book is available to purchase at waggonercowboys.com

The Waggoner D is applied to the right hip with the round part facing the calfÕs rear. The reversed triple D is the registered brand, but one D is sufficient for branding. The Waggoner Ranch, located in North Texas, is the largest ranch under one fence in the United States spreading 510,00 acres into six counties. Photographer Jeremy Enlow documented the 26 cowboys who work on the ranch and published a 140 page coffee table hardcover book, Cowboys of the Waggoner Ranch, which was released Nov. 1, 2015. The book is available to purchase at waggonercowboys.com

The Waggoner D is applied to the right hip with the round part facing the calfÕs rear. The reversed triple D is the registered brand, but one D is sufficient for branding.
The Waggoner Ranch, located in North Texas, is the largest ranch under one fence in the United States spreading 510,00 acres into six counties.
Photographer Jeremy Enlow documented the 26 cowboys who work on the ranch and published a 140 page coffee table hardcover book, Cowboys of the Waggoner Ranch, which was released Nov. 1, 2015.
The book is available to purchase at waggonercowboys.com

The Waggoner Ranch, located in North Texas, is the largest ranch under one fence in the United States spreading 510,00 acres into six counties. Photographer Jeremy Enlow documented the 26 cowboys who work on the ranch and published a 140 page coffee table hardcover book, Cowboys of the Waggoner Ranch, which was released Nov. 1, 2015. The book is available to purchase at waggonercowboys.com

The Waggoner Ranch, located in North Texas, is the largest ranch under one fence in the United States spreading 510,00 acres into six counties.
Photographer Jeremy Enlow documented the 26 cowboys who work on the ranch and published a 140 page coffee table hardcover book, Cowboys of the Waggoner Ranch, which was released Nov. 1, 2015.
The book is available to purchase at waggonercowboys.com

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Country Lifestyles

When a City Girl Goes Country

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By Annette Bridges

It was one of those necessary, yet very sad days in the life of a cattle rancher. We had to say goodbye to our bull, Frankie. We returned from the agonizing drive, and I felt compelled to sit down and ponder how to write an ode to a very good bull.

I have read all the rationale on when it is time to retire a bull. The average age for many ranchers is around eight years. Our Frankie was beyond his prime. We probably knew last year it was about time for him to retire. His lack of enthusiasm when he returned to the herd after his spring hiatus was a clue.

The very slow start to our spring calving this year, and cows that never conceived confirmed what we did not want to admit last year. It was time. Frankie was a handsome and gentle giant. A Charolais mix, but he could be fierce if he felt threatened.

To read more, pick up a copy of the May issue of NTFR. To subscribe by mail, call 940-872-5922.

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Country Lifestyles

Lacey’s Pantry

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Lacey Vilhauer

Ingredients:
1 lb. ground beef
1 package of taco seasoning or 2-3 Tbsp
homemade taco seasoning
2/3 cup water
16 oz. Monterey Jack cheese, shredded
8 oz. sharp cheddar, shredded
4 oz. can diced green chilies, undrained
4 large eggs, separated
2/3 cup heavy cream or evaporated milk
1 Tbsp flour
½ tsp salt
¼ tsp cayenne pepper
1 Roma tomato, sliced thinly

Directions:
Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and lightly coat a 9×13 baking dish with cooking spray. Set aside.
Heat a heavy-bottomed skillet over medium heat, then brown the ground beef. Drain.
Add the taco seasoning to the ground beef and 2/3 cup water. Stir well and let sauce thicken.
Transfer the ground beef to the prepared baking dish, spreading it into an even layer. Sprinkle the diced green chilies over the ground beef layer. Combine the shredded cheeses and sprinkle them over the ground beef and chilies. Set aside.
Separate the egg whites from the yolks, placing the egg whites in a medium-sized bowl, and the yolks into a separate medium-sized bowl. Add the heavy cream, flour, salt and cayenne pepper to the yolks. Whisk to combine.

To read more, pick up the June issue of NTFR magazine. To subscribe by mail, call 940-872-5922.

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Country Lifestyles

Jesses Jewelz

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By Jesse Kader

This month western meets safari with this fun army green jumpsuit. I love a good jumpsuit that is simple but stylish and can be accessorized in so many ways. This one especially caught my eye because of the western yoke detail. See this and more at www.jessesjewelz.com

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