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Summer crops, cotton to be spotlighted at Red River Crops Conference Jan. 27-28 in Childress

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By: Kay Ledbetter

Writer: Kay Ledbetter, 806-677-5608, [email protected]
Contacts: Stan Bevers, 940-552-9941, [email protected]

CHILDRESS – A day each of in-season and summer crops information and cotton talks will highlight the annual Red River Crops Conference on Jan 27-28 in Childress.

The two-day event is designed to provide crop production information for producers on both sides of the Red River in Southwest Oklahoma and the Texas Rolling Plains, said Stan Bevers, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service agricultural economist in Vernon.

The event will begin with registration from 7:45-8:15 a.m. Jan. 27 and continue through 4:15 p.m. Jan. 28 at the Fair Park Auditorium, 1000 Commerce St.

Preregistration by Jan. 23 is encouraged, Bevers said. The fee of $25 covers both days and includes noon meals.

To register, print the form fromhttp://agrisk.tamu.edu/. Make checks payable to and mail to the Red River Crops Conference, 100 N.W. Ave. E, Courthouse Box 9, Childress, TX. 79201-2351.

Continuing education units for private pesticide applicators and certified crop advisors are pending with both the Texas Department of Agriculture and the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture.

Bevers said AgriLife Extension and Oklahoma Cooperative Extension jointly host the annual event, which alternates between Oklahoma and Texas.

In-season and summer crops will be featured on Jan. 27. Discussion topics and speakers will include:

– Climate Update, Gary McManus, Oklahoma Mesonet state climatologist, Norman, Oklahoma.

– Specialty and Alternative Crops, Dr. Calvin Trostle, AgriLife Extension agronomist, Lubbock.

– Canola Production and Crop Year Outlook, Joshua Bushong, Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Servicewinter canola specialist, Stillwater, Oklahoma.

– 2014 Farm Bill Decisions, Dr. Joe Outlaw, AgriLife Extension economist, College Station.

– Weed Management in Wheat, Gary Strickland, Oklahoma Cooperative Extension educator in Jackson and Greer counties and Southwest Research and Extension Center dryland cropping systems specialist, Altus, Oklahoma.

– Wheat Grain and Grazing Interface, Bevers.

– Commodity Market Outlook, Jason Pace, Oklahoma Cooperative Extension agricultural economist, Southwest Area Office, Duncan, Oklahoma.

Cotton will be featured on Jan. 28, with topics and speakers including:

– National Cotton Council Update, Dr. Mark Lange, National Cotton Councilpresident and CEO, Cordova, Tennessee.

– Cotton Market Update and Outlook, Dr. John Robinson, AgriLife Extension economist-cotton marketing, College Station.

– Cotton STAX Insurance, Dr. Darren Hudson, Cotton Economics Research Institute director, Texas Tech University department of agricultural and applied economics, Lubbock.

– Cotton Disease Management, Dr. Jason Woodward, AgriLife Extension plant pathologist, Lubbock.

– Cotton Weed Management and Xtend Flex, Shane Osborne, Oklahoma Cooperative Extension specialist, Altus, Oklahoma, and Dr. Ty Witten, Monsantocotton specialty crop product management lead, St. Louis, Missouri.

– Cotton Fertilizer Management, Dr. Mark McFarland, Regents Fellow and acting associate head for AgriLife Extension in the Texas A&M University department of soil and crop sciences, College Station.

– New Cotton Genetics Performance,Dr. Gaylon Morgan, AgriLife Extension agronomist-cotton, College Station, and Dr. Randy Boman, Oklahoma State University Southwest Research and Extension Center director and cotton program leader, Altus, Oklahoma.

For more information, contact a local Extension office in either Texas or Oklahoma, or call Bevers at 940-552-9941, extension 225.

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Farm & Ranch

Mammals and Avian Influenza

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By Barry Whitworth, DVM

At the writing of this article, High Path Avian Influenza (HPAI) H5N1 has been detected in more than 83 million domestic poultry in the United States. The outbreak includes commercial and backyard flocks.

Most people are aware that poultry may succumb to Avian Influenza but may not know that other animals can be infected with the virus. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, a variety of mammals have been infected with Avian Influenza H5N1 in the U.S.

The list of more than 200 mammals includes bears, foxes, skunks, coyotes, etc. Even marine animals such as dolphins and seals have been found with the virus. Current Avian Influenza H5N1 infections in poultry, mammals, and livestock in the U.S. can be found at the Detections of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza website at https://www.aphis.usda.gov/livestock-poultry-disease/avian/avian-influenza/hpai-detections.

Recently, ruminants have been diagnosed with Avian Influenza H5N1 in the U.S. The World Organization for Animal Health reported that neonatal goats displaying neurological clinical signs and death were positive for Avian Influenza.

To read more, pick up a copy of the May issue of NTFR magazine. To subscribe by mail, call 940-872-5922.

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Farm & Ranch

Meanwhile, Back at the Ranch…

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By Rayford Pullen | [email protected]

When May arrives, we start thinking about weed control. With two years of drought under our belts, grass grazed short and hay stocks depleted, what we do now will influence our forage conditions for the entire year. With 75 percent of our annual warm season forages made by July 15 in North Texas, we need to get the grass growing while the sun shines.

Speaking of the sun shining, the biggest deterrent to growing lots of grass is restricted sunlight, and the biggest sun blockers we have are weeds.

Have you noticed weeds are normally just slightly taller than your grass and are probably blocking 90 percent of the sunlight from reaching the grass itself? So obviously, we need to improve conditions, so sunlight reaches the plants we want to grow.

With grass extremely short, more sunlight is hitting the soil surface now, which in turn results in more weed seed germinating. With the moisture we have received, we expect an abundance of weeds this year.

To read more, pick up a copy of the May issue of NTFR magazine. To subscribe by mail, call 940-872-5922.

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Farm & Ranch

Land Market Report: March Land Sales

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By Jared Groce

Rural land sales are continuing on a steady pace for early spring, with prices holding very strong with the sell-to-list price ratios remaining very high, even on properties that have been on the market for a longer than usual time period. The total number of transactions are picking up once again as the spring selling season kicks off, and the average acreage continues to decrease.

Larger acreage properties seem to be in higher demand than smaller properties currently, with many buyers simply parking cash in real estate to hedge against inflation. Interest rates seem to have settled down and most experts agree that rates will be reduced by the fed this year. Some lenders have programs in place that allow the buyer to reduce their rates without having to go through a full refinance ordeal.

To read more, pick up a copy of the May issue of NTFR magazine. To subscribe by mail, call 940-872-5922.

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