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February 2017 Profile – Leading a Legacy : The Ellis Family of G – C Ranch

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By Jessica Crabtree

To G.C. and Mary Ellis, family is everything. The two cultivated a life together 41 years ago. He was from Dallas and she from a town in western Massachusetts. The two met while attending school at the University of Denver. “They’re perfect together,” said their daughter Meredith Ellis Ulibarri.

Ellis was raised in Dallas. His family’s ranch was called the Bell Branch Ranch. Upon returning home from college, Ellis stepped up to manage the place; five years later the family made the decision to sell. In ’80 the ranch was sold and the couple moved to Cooke County to work for the family’s fishing lure manufacturing company, Bomber Bait in Gainesville, Texas. At that time the couple began combing the countryside in search of a place to settle and call their own. In ’83 Ellis found his dream, even saying he wore out two pickups looking for it.

The G Bar C Ranch is settled in Cooke County, between the small, rural towns of Rosston and Era, Texas. The ranch was initially 450 acres, “The fences were bad. There was no electricity, no septic, no well. We had to start over,” said Ellis. He and Mary had very little time to waste: the home they rented was promised to another. Ellis said the property was purchased in January of ’83 and he moved a home in, got electricity, a well and septic by April.

“I chose to raise Longhorn cows,” Ellis said. “The main reason was they’re tough and require less maintenance. “Raising cattle and still working at Bomber Bait, the rancher had grown a sizeable herd of longhorns. “Michael Knabe came to work for us in ’89 and helped to grow the herd to around 200 longhorns and began rotational grazing methods. At the time we didn’t have as many pastures as we do today,” Ellis explained.

To read more pick up a copy of the February 2017 NTFR issue. To subscribe call 940-872-5922.

Mike Knabe  (Photos by John Irwin)

G.C. Ellis

Meredith Ellis Ulibarri

Marry Ellis

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Country Lifestyles

Lacey’s Pantry: Chicken Wings

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By Lacey Vilhauer

Hot Honey Chicken Wings

Ingredients

Wings:
1 tbsp olive oil
1 1/2 tsp smoked paprika
1 tsp onion powder
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp pepper
1 lbs. chicken wings, split into flats and drumettes

Hot honey butter:
1 stick of unsalted butter, melted
1/3 cup hot sauce
1/2 cup honey
3/4 tsp kosher salt

Directions
In a large bowl whisk together olive oil, paprika, onion powder, salt and pepper. Add wings and toss to coat fully. You can also put wings and coating in a ziplock bag and shake to coat.
Heat air fryer to 400 degrees. Arrange wings in an even layer in the air fryer basket. Cook for 12 minutes.
While the wings are cooking, make hot honey butter sauce. In a medium bowl, whisk together butter, hot sauce, honey and salt, taste and add more salt if needed.

To read more, pick up a copy of the March issue of NTFR Magazine. To subscribe call 940-872-5922.

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Country Lifestyles

Jesses Jewelz

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There’s still some chill in the air and a need for sleeves before we hit spring. This mesh western print top is the prefect addition to wardrobe to layer under your short sleeves with, and I think it pairs perfectly with the jumpsuit. So many options with both of these pieces to dress up or keep it casual. Find these and more at www.jessesjewelz.com.

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Country Lifestyles

When a City Girl Goes Country

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By Annette Bridges

Most of the time I’m all about not simply following the crowd. I’m a fan of thinking outside the box. I love creative folks who are always coming up with unique ideas and new ways of doing things. I’m especially tickled when someone comes up with a fresh idea that implements the smarter-not-harder philosophy.

Those folks that inspire me the most know themselves very well and stay true to their desires and passions even when that makes them different from the majority of popular opinion or fads, but are there times when having a herd mentality gets a bad rap? Our cows certainly seem to believe so.

Is there more than one trail that leads to water? Perhaps, but why not simply follow the well-established path that has proven to be reliable in the past? Why should you follow other cows making their way toward a gate that leads to a different pasture? History tells us that when others are moseying toward or waiting at a closed gate, it is very likely the gate will soon be opened and access to fresh grass can be reached.

To read more, pick up a copy of the March issue of NTFR Magazine. To subscribe call 940-872-5922.

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