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Lacey’s Pantry: Pan-seared Venison

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By Lacey Vilhaue

Ingredients:
1/2 pound of venison backstrap or tenderloin
Salt
2 tbsp unsalted butter
1 shallot, minced
3 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cups brandy
1/2 cup venison or beef broth
1 tbsp worcestershire sauce
1 tbsp dijon mustard
1 tbsp tomato paste
1/4 cup heavy cream
Minced basil, parsley, chives to garnish

Instructions:
Bring the venison loin out of the fridge, salt it well and let it come to room temperature, at least 20 minutes. Heat the butter in a large saute pan over medium-high heat for about 90 seconds. Pat the venison dry with a paper towel and cook it on all sides. Turn the heat to medium so the butter doesn’t scorch. It should take about 8 to 10 minutes or so to get a nice brown crust on the venison without overcooking the center. Remove the venison, tent loosely with foil and set aside.

To read more pick up a copy of NTFR magazine. To subscribe call 940-872-5922.

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Country Lifestyles

Holding the Ball

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By Brandon Baumgarten

Did you play basketball in high school? Did you ever notice how some teams would hold on to the ball for extended periods of time? The strategy is to eliminate as much time off the clock as possible and close out the quarter with the lead. Some teams do this. Other teams do it more frequently than others. It is grueling to watch as a spectator as you watch the game evaporate as the team just holds possession of the ball. However, things are changing.

In fact, in Oregon, things are about to change when it comes to high school basketball. Their state just voted on adding a 35 second shot clock for the 2023-2024 season. No doubt, this move will increase the pace of the game and create scoring opportunities.

The problem has become that many people want to hold on to the ball too long without doing much with it. I could not help to think this week of how this scenario relates to our faith in God. It is one thing to have an opportunity, but it is another thing to make the most of it.

To read more pick up a copy of NTFR magazine. To subscribe call 940-872-5922.

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Country Lifestyles

Jesses Jewelz

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This might be one of my favorite dresses to date. The horse print and colors are a subtle statement for any occasion. This dress is such a classic piece and has a fantastic, flattering fit. Great for year-round wear, no matter the weather. See this and more at www.jessesjewelz.com.

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Country Lifestyles

Burns Ranch: A Legacy of the Past, Present and Future

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By Dani Blackburn

In 1890, Aldolphus W. Raht purchased a portion of the Red River Cattle Company with headquarters at the original Block Bar Ranch in Clay County.

During his time as a rancher, Aldolphus focused on raising high quality ranch horses and Hereford cattle while he and his wife, Ella Mae, raised one son on the ranch, Carlyle Graham, who became an author. He penned a collection of firsthand stories on the cattle ranch, “Old Buck and I,” during a time of Indian raids and fence wars.

In 1928, blizzards, drought and disease forced the Rahts to deed the ranch to banker Carl Worsham of Henrietta. In 1934, Lillian and L.T. Burns, of Wichita Falls, purchased the ranch from the Worsham Estate at $9.70 per acre.

Lillian’s grandfather, Kit Carter, was a prominent cattleman near Palo Pinto and served as the first president of the Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association in 1877. The TSCRA continues to play a vital role in the cattle industry, just as the Burns’ love of agriculture has continued to be passed through six generations of the family as Becky Burns Johnson and her son, Graham, strive to continue their strong ranching legacy for future generations.

Becky, the granddaughter of L.T. and Lillian, spent her childhood summers on the ranch as an only girl with three brothers. Her grandparents lived in Wichita Falls but visited the ranch often during the year and for one month every summer. At the time, the Burns raised registered Hereford cattle.

“I came out and we always went with the cowboy crew branding. I am sure we thought we were helping. I thought I was Annie Oakley and could do anything, but I wanted to prove to my brothers I was as tough as they were,” Becky said. “I grew up with this land in my family.”

To read more pick up a copy of NTFR magazine. To subscribe call 940-872-5922.


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