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Pearson Livestock Equipment: Designed for cattlemen by cattlemen

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By staff writer Jessica Bartel

Everyone has a story, each unique in its own way. Many times we don’t even realize how dramatically one seemingly small decision can impact our lives. This is true of the Rater family’s story which began with the purchase of a quality piece of livestock equipment. David Rater grew up in Antelope, TX and currently lives there with his wife JoAnn on a piece of land his grandparents owned. The two were high school sweethearts in Archer City, TX and will be married 40 years this May. Together

they have three children they raised in this area. Since an early age Rater, a cattleman with 34 years of experience in banking, has run cattle on that land. Fifteen years ago, while processing yearlings with a chute that was less than satisfactory he decided it was time to upgrade.
The Raters researched different chutes and were very impressed with Pearson Livestock Equipment’s overall product line. Their chute was high quality, easy to use and
had many convenient features. While buying the chute, Rater became acquainted with Pearson Livestock Equipment owners Jack and Gail Johnston. A mutual friendship was born and several years later Johnston, preparing for retirement, proposed to Rater the idea of buying the company.

To read more pick up the March 2014 issue of North Texas Farm & Ranch.

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Farm & Ranch

Ag Elsewhere: Montana

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By Lindsey Monk

Calving season is in full swing, which means branding is next!

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Farm & Ranch

Meanwhile, Back at the Ranch…

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By Rayford Pullen | rcpullen@yahoo.com

Is spring yet? If you are like me, this seems like the longest winter we have ever had. When spring does arrive in full force, it will be a photo finish regarding our hay inventory and the emergence of green grass.

With the winter we have had, regarding costs, this has also been the most expensive when it comes to the price of hay and feed. Happiness is winter in our rearview mirror around here.
Spring will arrive this month in most parts of Texas, and with it will come new calves and breeding decisions.

Those cows that made it through the winter are probably in fair to decent shape and will need a month or so of great grazing to get back in shape, while they are also nursing a calf.
In the case of first calf heifers, they are trying to grow and put on weight without their permanent incisors.

These young females are asked to do a lot and may need a little extra help, nutrition wise, to get rebred on time and continue calving during the target months. Around here, if a heifer is born in February or March, we expect her to calve at age two in the same month she was born. It does not always work out, but that is our goal.

With bull turn out for spring calving cows and heifers being mid-April to mid-May, we certainly hope and expect them to be gaining weight and be in shape to conceive as early in the breeding season as possible.

To read more, pick up a copy of the March issue of NTFR Magazine. To subscribe call 940-872-5922.

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Farm & Ranch

Noble Learning: Who Will Take Over the Ranch?

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Planning for your ranch’s succession ensures the legacy you want to leave for your land. Here are seven steps to consider.

By Katie Miller

As Benjamin Franklin famously said, “Nothing is certain except death and taxes.” Most ranchers don’t like to discuss either, but having a ranch succession plan in place can ensure the future of your land and legacy when you’re no longer at the helm. While estate planning is what makes sure your assets are passed on to the desired recipients, succession planning is the road map to transitioning a business to the next generation, according to Dan Childs, Noble Research Institute senior agricultural consultant.

As Jason Bradley, agricultural economics consultant for the institute, notes, succession planning is especially vital to the legacy regenerative ranchers hope to leave.

“I think of the story of the old man who plants trees knowing he will never sit in the shade of those trees,” Bradley says. “Ranchers want to better the land so they can pass on something that they helped rebuild and rejuvenate.”

To read more, pick up a copy of the March issue of NTFR Magazine. To subscribe call 940-872-5922.

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